The Importance of Hand Sketch

G107, Bao’an, Shenzhen, masterplan, city planning, sustainable, green, manufacturing, avoid obvious, tetra, architecture, planners, architects, aoarchitect, tetra-arch, connections, drone, highway, future, futuristic, carbon zero, carbon neutral, china, hong kong, pearl river delta, Baoan, autopilot, driverless, high speed, transit, multimodal, connections, sharing economy, co-working, shared, amenities, natural, nature, road, infrastructure, water cycle, water management, landscape, design, branding, engineering, marketing, drone-view, aerial, airport

The Importance of Hand Sketch

Before we started generating 30 images and a 2 min fly through video for this Organic Highway. We generated hundreds of hand sketches to identify potential of each architecture and spaces. We assign value to each of them based on their importance to the overall story. We prioritized them based on their value and finished them one by one. The less important one received less details. We believe each view has to speak a unique quality. A repetitive story or clone-line image could be dull and would waste our valuable time in competition. That’s why we still believe hand sketch is the best way to visualize the entire story before digital production.

One good thing about hand sketches is that we won’t care about dimension and feasibility. We worked on the story and resolved technicality during digital drawings. We were able to crank out the entire story board in 2 days and split the workflow to 12 people. Hand sketches at the end became our tool of project management and control the outcome from 12 people working in 3 different time zones.

G107, Bao’an, Shenzhen, masterplan, city planning, sustainable, green, manufacturing, avoid obvious, tetra, architecture, planners, architects, aoarchitect, tetra-arch, connections, drone, highway, future, futuristic, carbon zero, carbon neutral, china, hong kong, pearl river delta, Baoan, autopilot, driverless, high speed, transit, multimodal, connections, sharing economy, co-working, shared, amenities, natural, nature, road, infrastructure, water cycle, water management, landscape, design, branding, engineering, marketing, drone-view, aerial, airport Photo 17-7-2016, 8 37 57 AM Photo 17-7-2016, 7 54 14 AM

G107, Bao’an, Shenzhen, masterplan, city planning, sustainable, green, manufacturing, avoid obvious, tetra, architecture, planners, architects, aoarchitect, tetra-arch, connections, drone, highway, future, futuristic, carbon zero, carbon neutral, china, hong kong, pearl river delta, Baoan, autopilot, driverless, high speed, transit, multimodal, connections, sharing economy, co-working, shared, amenities, natural, nature, road, infrastructure, water cycle, water management, landscape, design, branding, engineering, marketing, drone-view, aerial, airport

Stella Tower

Avoid Obvious, Stella Tower, JDS, New York, Residence, Architecture, Art Deco, Walker tower,

The Making of Stella Tower

Avoid Obvious worked on the real estate sales package for Stella Tower in 2013. Our job included exterior 3d modeling, drawing interpretation and 2d plan drawings. The project was our first 3d model with Art Deco Details. The final buildings looks more like a piece of jewelry than a building. The process of the conversion was inevitably manual. We had to trace a lot of details from the original hand drawings. The beauty of a hand drawing is that they left many details to be interpreted by the contractors. The process of modeling the tower in a way turns us into a contractor. We have to guess using our professional judgement what some of the elevation lines means in sections. It has a fun process to interpret Art Deco our ways and rebuilt a 3d crown. Below are three interesting facts we discovered.

Interesting fact #1: The buildings are filled with windows with 21 different sizes. It was an process in itself just to identify all types of windows. The unique sizes made the elevation rendering more amazing.

Interesting fact #2: The crown was built originally but demolished before the conversion. During the design process, the crown was misunderstood as a dome. Avoid Obvious interpreted some original hand drawing to discover that the crown was in fact a 4 sided panels with an open top. The hand drawing was also quite frizzy as a scan. It took us several days to remake what the original intent was.

Interesting fact #3: The apartment plans of the building are so unique. None of the 51 units repeats in size or shape. We had to write an automated script to convert some of the plans into a graphical plans. Interestingly, our buildings built with computers these days are more repetitive than buildings built with hand drawings. We definitely lost some art and craft to the computers.

Credit:

Avoid Obvious Team: Kristen Muller, Zakiya Dawkins, Chris Chang, Adrian Lo, Vicky Chan

More images on StellaTower.com

Developer: JDS Development Group

Original Architect: Ralph Thomas Walker, FAIA

Architect of Record: CetraRuddy

Avoid Obvious was hired by advertising agency The Seventh Art for this project.

Avoid Obvious, Stella Tower, JDS, New York, Residence, Architecture, Art Deco, Walker tower,

Avoid Obvious, Stella Tower, JDS, New York, Residence, Architecture, Art Deco, Walker tower,

Avoid Obvious, Stella Tower, JDS, New York, Residence, Architecture, Art Deco, Walker tower,

Avoid Obvious, Stella Tower, JDS, New York, Residence, Architecture, Art Deco, Walker tower,Avoid Obvious, Stella Tower, JDS, New York, Residence, Architecture, Art Deco, Walker tower, Avoid Obvious, Stella Tower, JDS, New York, Residence, Architecture, Art Deco, Walker tower,

BFDA

Avoid Obvious, Brooklyn, Accelerator, Green beauty, BFDA, BF+DA, Pratt, 630 Flushing

The future of Retail : BFDA

BFDA is a fashion accelerator in Brooklyn. It is located on the 7th floor of 630 Flushing Ave. Avoid Obvious worked with Deb Johnson and her BFDA team to establish a set of fund raising package. The package include design and render 7 spaces with BFDA. It was an amazing process to work with fashion designers and industrial designers to come up with a designer space they enjoyed. The relics from the Pfizer buildings not only gives the space a real industrial look, their idea to combine manufacturing, design and retail into the same hub is also revolutionary.

We believe an integrated space like this is the future of the fashion industry. It not only shortens the carbon footer by reducing the distance between end users and designers. This localized hub is also coherent to the maker movement with the ideas to turn everyone into a maker. When people are proud of what they make, they will less likely to throw away their products. It is overall more sustainable.

Our study on the Wanda Pavilion only shares the same ideas.

More images of the BFDA project is here.
Below is the publication on Green Beauty Magazine. Article by Amy DuFault.

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